Shots from my IPod...

Originally started out as a way to show my creative side via photos shot on my Ipod. Now a place to show that but also comment on the things I believe in and admire or find interesting.

I believe in God, Country Family, and Brotherhood.

I find interesting Art of all types, Guns, Hunting, and anything that can be done outdoors.

Military history and the reasons and actions before and after a conflict have always intrigued me.

Somethings I post are designed to "stir the pot" and won't be politically correct nor in line with todays skewed sense of reality nor equality. Politics are the things that tear us apart but you have to pick a place to stand.

Have traveled the world and seen the best and worst that the human can do to another.

Life isn't fair, the world owes you nothing and hardwork pays the best rewards. You earn respect but must give it as well. We can learn from history; be it yours, your parents, their parents or the world. Evil truly exists in the world, fight it. The Constitution was written for a reason and it deserves to be defended.

Politicians have no ones interests in mind except for them to remain power.



Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

Prison identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during the war. On 6 June 1944, D-Day, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport aircraft Beyrle was in came under enemy fire over the Normandy coast, and he was forced to jump from the exceedingly low altitude of 120 meters. After landing in Saint-Côme-du-Mont, he lost contact with his fellow paratroopers, but succeeded in blowing up a power station before being apprehended by the Germans a few days later. Over the next seven months, Beyrle was held in seven different German POW camps. He escaped twice, only to be recaptured each time. Beyrle was taken to the Stalag III-C POW camp in Alt Drewitz bei Küstrin in Neumark, state of Brandenburg (now Drzewice, Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland), about 50 mi (80 km) east of Berlin where he escaped in early January 1945. Knowing the Soviets were advancing much quicker from the east than the Americans, British and others were from the west, Beyrle headed eastward. Encountering the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the middle of January, he raised his hands, holding a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes, and shouted in Russian, “Amerikansky tovarishch!" ("American comrade!"). Beyrle was eventually able to persuade the battalion’s commander, who, incidentally, was the legendary Alexandra Samusenko, possibly the only Soviet female tank officer with the rank of Guards Captain, to allow him to fight alongside the unit on its way to Berlin. Thus, Beyrle began his month-long stint in a Soviet tank battalion, where his demolitions expertise was appreciated. Beyrle’s new battalion was the one that freed one of his former camps, Stalag III-C, at the end of January. But, in the first week of February, he was wounded during an attack by German Luftwaffe Stuka (Junkers Ju 87) dive bombers. He was evacuated to a Soviet hospital in Landsberg an der Warthe (now Gorzów Wielkopolski, in Poland), where he received a visit from Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who, intrigued by the only non-Soviet in the hospital, learned his story through an interpreter, and provided Beyrle with official papers in order to rejoin the American forces. Joining a Soviet military convoy, Beyrle arrived at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in February 1945, only to learn that he had been reported by the U.S. War Department as killed in action on 10 June 1944 on French soil. A funeral mass had been held in his honor in his hometown of Muskegon, Michigan and his obituary was published in the local newspaper. Sgt. Beyrle returned home to Michigan on 21 April 1945. He would marry in 1946, coincidentally, in the same church and by the same priest who held his funeral mass two years earlier. Beyrle died in 2004 at the age of 81. His son John Beyrle would serve as the United States Ambassador to Russia from 2008 to 2012. Stalag XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Hesse, Germany. July 1944.

bag-of-dirt:

Prison identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during the war. On 6 June 1944, D-Day, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport aircraft Beyrle was in came under enemy fire over the Normandy coast, and he was forced to jump from the exceedingly low altitude of 120 meters. After landing in Saint-Côme-du-Mont, he lost contact with his fellow paratroopers, but succeeded in blowing up a power station before being apprehended by the Germans a few days later. Over the next seven months, Beyrle was held in seven different German POW camps. He escaped twice, only to be recaptured each time. Beyrle was taken to the Stalag III-C POW camp in Alt Drewitz bei Küstrin in Neumark, state of Brandenburg (now Drzewice, Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland), about 50 mi (80 km) east of Berlin where he escaped in early January 1945. Knowing the Soviets were advancing much quicker from the east than the Americans, British and others were from the west, Beyrle headed eastward. Encountering the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the middle of January, he raised his hands, holding a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes, and shouted in Russian, “Amerikansky tovarishch!" ("American comrade!"). Beyrle was eventually able to persuade the battalion’s commander, who, incidentally, was the legendary Alexandra Samusenko, possibly the only Soviet female tank officer with the rank of Guards Captain, to allow him to fight alongside the unit on its way to Berlin. Thus, Beyrle began his month-long stint in a Soviet tank battalion, where his demolitions expertise was appreciated. Beyrle’s new battalion was the one that freed one of his former camps, Stalag III-C, at the end of January. But, in the first week of February, he was wounded during an attack by German Luftwaffe Stuka (Junkers Ju 87) dive bombers. He was evacuated to a Soviet hospital in Landsberg an der Warthe (now Gorzów Wielkopolski, in Poland), where he received a visit from Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who, intrigued by the only non-Soviet in the hospital, learned his story through an interpreter, and provided Beyrle with official papers in order to rejoin the American forces. Joining a Soviet military convoy, Beyrle arrived at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in February 1945, only to learn that he had been reported by the U.S. War Department as killed in action on 10 June 1944 on French soil. A funeral mass had been held in his honor in his hometown of Muskegon, Michigan and his obituary was published in the local newspaper. Sgt. Beyrle returned home to Michigan on 21 April 1945. He would marry in 1946, coincidentally, in the same church and by the same priest who held his funeral mass two years earlier. Beyrle died in 2004 at the age of 81. His son John Beyrle would serve as the United States Ambassador to Russia from 2008 to 2012. Stalag XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Hesse, Germany. July 1944.

Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

Wounded Georgian soldiers are photographed shortly after the Georgian Uprising on Texel. The uprising began on 5 April 1945 on the Dutch island of Texel where approximately 800 Georgian soldiers of the 882nd Infantry Battalion Königin Tamara of the Georgian Legion were stationed while fighting in the German Wehrmacht. Most of the Georgians were former Soviet Army POWs who, following capture by the Germans, were given a choice: either remain a POW in the camps, which would have meant abuse, starvation, disease and quite possibly death, or to serve in the Wehrmacht, be fed and be allowed a degree of freedom. The battalion was formed of men who chose the latter option; most were well aware of the conditions in German POW and concentration camps for Soviet prisoners of war. Others had been conscripted into the Soviet Army and had aspirations for Georgian independence from the Soviet Union and felt very little loyalty or affinity to the U.S.S.R anyway. Following preparations by the Germans in late March 1945 to move several companies of the battalion to the Dutch mainland to oppose Allied advances, the Georgian soldiers, with aid from Dutch locals and Dutch Resistance, began a violent insurrection. Shortly after midnight on the night of 5-6 April 1945, the Georgians rose up and gained control of nearly the entire island. Approximately four hundred German soldiers were killed in the initial uprising, almost all while sleeping in the quarters they shared with the Georgians. Others were shot and killed while standing guard or walking the roads of the island in groups or individually that night and the following day. Although aided by many of the Dutch locals, the success of the rebellion hinged on an expected Allied landing, which did not occur. A German counterattack was ordered and approximately 2,000 German riflemen were deployed from the Dutch mainland and fighting on Texel escalated, lasting another five weeks, beyond the German capitulation in the Netherlands, and even beyond Germany’s general surrender to the Allies on 8 May. The fighting continued until Canadian troops arrived on 20 May 1945 to enforce the German surrender, and disarmed the remaining German troops. Approximately 565 Georgians and 120 Dutch were killed during the insurrection, with the Germans losing 812 soldiers. The 228 Georgians who survived by hiding from German troops in coastal minefields or who were concealed by Texel farmers were then turned over to the Soviet authorities. After arrival at a collection camp in the Soviet Union, most of the Georgians were charged with treason and disappeared into the Soviet gulag system. Texel island, North Holland, Netherlands. May 1945. Image taken by J. A. van der Vlis.

bag-of-dirt:

Wounded Georgian soldiers are photographed shortly after the Georgian Uprising on Texel. The uprising began on 5 April 1945 on the Dutch island of Texel where approximately 800 Georgian soldiers of the 882nd Infantry Battalion Königin Tamara of the Georgian Legion were stationed while fighting in the German Wehrmacht. Most of the Georgians were former Soviet Army POWs who, following capture by the Germans, were given a choice: either remain a POW in the camps, which would have meant abuse, starvation, disease and quite possibly death, or to serve in the Wehrmacht, be fed and be allowed a degree of freedom. The battalion was formed of men who chose the latter option; most were well aware of the conditions in German POW and concentration camps for Soviet prisoners of war. Others had been conscripted into the Soviet Army and had aspirations for Georgian independence from the Soviet Union and felt very little loyalty or affinity to the U.S.S.R anyway. Following preparations by the Germans in late March 1945 to move several companies of the battalion to the Dutch mainland to oppose Allied advances, the Georgian soldiers, with aid from Dutch locals and Dutch Resistance, began a violent insurrection. Shortly after midnight on the night of 5-6 April 1945, the Georgians rose up and gained control of nearly the entire island. Approximately four hundred German soldiers were killed in the initial uprising, almost all while sleeping in the quarters they shared with the Georgians. Others were shot and killed while standing guard or walking the roads of the island in groups or individually that night and the following day. Although aided by many of the Dutch locals, the success of the rebellion hinged on an expected Allied landing, which did not occur. A German counterattack was ordered and approximately 2,000 German riflemen were deployed from the Dutch mainland and fighting on Texel escalated, lasting another five weeks, beyond the German capitulation in the Netherlands, and even beyond Germany’s general surrender to the Allies on 8 May. The fighting continued until Canadian troops arrived on 20 May 1945 to enforce the German surrender, and disarmed the remaining German troops. Approximately 565 Georgians and 120 Dutch were killed during the insurrection, with the Germans losing 812 soldiers. The 228 Georgians who survived by hiding from German troops in coastal minefields or who were concealed by Texel farmers were then turned over to the Soviet authorities. After arrival at a collection camp in the Soviet Union, most of the Georgians were charged with treason and disappeared into the Soviet gulag system. Texel island, North Holland, Netherlands. May 1945. Image taken by J. A. van der Vlis.

Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

A Finnish pilot of the Finnish Air Force (Finnish: Ilmavoimat) flies over the Finnish countryside during the Finnish-Soviet Continuation War with a glider in tow. Jämijärvi, Satakunta Region, Finland. 17 July 1942.

bag-of-dirt:

A Finnish pilot of the Finnish Air Force (Finnish: Ilmavoimat) flies over the Finnish countryside during the Finnish-Soviet Continuation War with a glider in tow. Jämijärvi, Satakunta Region, Finland. 17 July 1942.

Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

Demobilized Japanese soldiers and civilians crowd into passenger cars aboard trains bound for Tokyo following the surrender of the Empire of Japan to the Allies on 2 September 1945, and the atomic bomb dropped on the city the month prior. Hiroshima, Hiroshima Prefecture, Chūgoku region, Honshu, Japan. 8 September 1945.

bag-of-dirt:

Demobilized Japanese soldiers and civilians crowd into passenger cars aboard trains bound for Tokyo following the surrender of the Empire of Japan to the Allies on 2 September 1945, and the atomic bomb dropped on the city the month prior. Hiroshima, Hiroshima Prefecture, Chūgoku region, Honshu, Japan. 8 September 1945.

Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

Soviet soldiers march past two destroyed German 15 cm sIG 33 (schweres Infanterie Geschütz 33) infantry guns in the captured city of Königsberg following Battle of Königsberg of the East Prussian Offensive during the Soviet advance westward. Approximately 120,000 German civilian survivors remained in the ruins of the devastated city following the battle. The vast majority of the German civilians left Königsberg shortly afterwards. The area of East Prussia was annexed by the U.S.S.R. in 1946, with the region becoming the Kaliningrad Oblast exclave and the city renamed Kaliningrad. The remaining 20,000 German residents were expelled by the Soviets in 1949-50. Königsberg, Province of East Prussia, Germany (now, Kaliningrad, Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia). 13 April 1945.

bag-of-dirt:

Soviet soldiers march past two destroyed German 15 cm sIG 33 (schweres Infanterie Geschütz 33) infantry guns in the captured city of Königsberg following Battle of Königsberg of the East Prussian Offensive during the Soviet advance westward. Approximately 120,000 German civilian survivors remained in the ruins of the devastated city following the battle. The vast majority of the German civilians left Königsberg shortly afterwards. The area of East Prussia was annexed by the U.S.S.R. in 1946, with the region becoming the Kaliningrad Oblast exclave and the city renamed Kaliningrad. The remaining 20,000 German residents were expelled by the Soviets in 1949-50. Königsberg, Province of East Prussia, Germany (now, Kaliningrad, Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia). 13 April 1945.

Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

Lithuanian soldiers triumphantly parade though Vilnius, as citizens throw flowers and display the Lithuanian flag. Following World War I, Vilnius (Polish: Wilno) was ceded to Lithuania. Both Poland and Lithuania perceived the city as their own. The League of Nations became involved in the subsequent dispute between the two countries. On 9 October 1920, the Polish Army surreptitiously seized Vilnius during an operation known as Żeligowski’s Mutiny, with Poland making the city the capital of Wilno Voivodeship. Lithuania vigorously contested the Polish annexation of Vilnius and refused diplomatic relations with Poland and moved the Lithuanian capital to Kaunas. When the Germans and Soviets invaded and partitioned Poland in September 1939, the Soviets returned Vilnius to Lithuania. This was strategic move on the part of the Soviets. As Lithuania jubilantly celebrated the return of Vilnius, the Soviets had already secretly determined the fate of the whole of Lithuania in August of 1939 during the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact between the U.S.S.R. and Germany. The following year, Lithuania would be invaded, occupied and annexed by the Soviet Union and Vilnius would become the capital of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic. Lithuania would only regain its pre-war independence in 1991, over fifty years following outbreak of the war. Vilnius, Vilnius County, Lithuania. 29 October 1939.

bag-of-dirt:

Lithuanian soldiers triumphantly parade though Vilnius, as citizens throw flowers and display the Lithuanian flag. Following World War I, Vilnius (Polish: Wilno) was ceded to Lithuania. Both Poland and Lithuania perceived the city as their own. The League of Nations became involved in the subsequent dispute between the two countries. On 9 October 1920, the Polish Army surreptitiously seized Vilnius during an operation known as Żeligowski’s Mutiny, with Poland making the city the capital of Wilno Voivodeship. Lithuania vigorously contested the Polish annexation of Vilnius and refused diplomatic relations with Poland and moved the Lithuanian capital to Kaunas. When the Germans and Soviets invaded and partitioned Poland in September 1939, the Soviets returned Vilnius to Lithuania. This was strategic move on the part of the Soviets. As Lithuania jubilantly celebrated the return of Vilnius, the Soviets had already secretly determined the fate of the whole of Lithuania in August of 1939 during the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact between the U.S.S.R. and Germany. The following year, Lithuania would be invaded, occupied and annexed by the Soviet Union and Vilnius would become the capital of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic. Lithuania would only regain its pre-war independence in 1991, over fifty years following outbreak of the war. Vilnius, Vilnius County, Lithuania. 29 October 1939.

Reblogged from bag-of-dirt
bag-of-dirt:

Refugees return to the destroyed Alsatian village of Mittelwihr following the German retreat. Left behind is a German Jagdpanzer IV 70 (A) tank destroyer. Alsace, a region of France largely populated with ethnic Germanic Alsatians who speak Alsatian (a Low Alemannic German dialect), was occupied by Germany in 1940. Although Germany never formally annexed Alsace, it was incorporated into the Greater German Reich and restructured into a Reichsgau (an administrative subdivision created in a number of the areas annexed to Germany). Alsace was merged with Baden, and Lorraine with the Saarland, to become part of a planned Gau Westmark, an extension of Germany’s western border. During the war, 130,000 young men from Alsace and Lorraine were inducted into the German military, including the Waffen-SS. Following the defeat of Germany, Alsace was returned to France. Mittelwihr, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France. February 1945.

bag-of-dirt:

Refugees return to the destroyed Alsatian village of Mittelwihr following the German retreat. Left behind is a German Jagdpanzer IV 70 (A) tank destroyer. Alsace, a region of France largely populated with ethnic Germanic Alsatians who speak Alsatian (a Low Alemannic German dialect), was occupied by Germany in 1940. Although Germany never formally annexed Alsace, it was incorporated into the Greater German Reich and restructured into a Reichsgau (an administrative subdivision created in a number of the areas annexed to Germany). Alsace was merged with Baden, and Lorraine with the Saarland, to become part of a planned Gau Westmark, an extension of Germany’s western border. During the war, 130,000 young men from Alsace and Lorraine were inducted into the German military, including the Waffen-SS. Following the defeat of Germany, Alsace was returned to France. Mittelwihr, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France. February 1945.

Reblogged from toocatsoriginals

toocatsoriginals:

Convair XC-99 - Prototype Heavy Cargo Aircraft Based on the B-36 Peacemaker

First flew in 1947. Could carry over 100,000 lbs of cargo or 60,000 lbs of cargo 12,000 nautical miles. Only one was built, but it served with the United States Air Force until 1957, primarily ferrying spare parts for B-36 Peacemaker bombers - 7.400 hours of flight time and 60 million pounds of cargo were carried. The sole XC-99 is part of the National Museum of the United States Air Force collection, awaiting restoration.

via Travel for Aircraft

(via pipius)

Reblogged from 6woofs

6woofs:

The last one kills me.

(via littlemiss-b)

Reblogged from weaponslover
weaponslover:

J.L. Wilkins 700 Nitro Express double rifle

weaponslover:

J.L. Wilkins 700 Nitro Express double rifle

(Source: weaponslover, via 1-10-twist)